Food for Thought: Setting the Table for Learning

Credit: iStock.com/WichitS
Credit: iStock.com/WichitS

Whenever a restaurant asks him for a credit card to schedule a reservation, New York Times food critic Pete Wells writes, “I hear several messages, none of them warm and fuzzy. [The practice] says that I’m not trustworthy. . . . It says that a reservation isn’t an appointment with pleasure; it’s an obligation to be kept.”


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