Taking Risks in Your Teaching

Any instructional practice that is new to you, such as group testing, giving students a role in creating a classroom policy, or getting students involved in assessment, is not just a new activity that requires attention to a new set of implementation details; it's a practice that shines light on fundamental beliefs about teaching and learning. It raises questions, challenges what we believe, and enables us to consider how aspects of teaching and learning look when viewed from a different perspective. Maybe our beliefs can't change, or maybe the practice doesn't fit with a particular educational philosophy, but isn't it better to have at least considered it or tried so we can say with authority that it's at odds with what we believe?

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