Concept Maps for Learning

Credit: iStock.com/marekuliasz
Credit: iStock.com/marekuliasz
We learn by connecting new information to prior knowledge (Palfreman, 1992). Much of this involves categorizing information according to patterns. Whereas the average American football fan just sees 11 individual defenders on the field, a veteran NFL quarterback sees the formation within the context of a category, such as a “two-deep zone.” This allows him to quickly interpret formations and decide how to react to them. In this way, much of expertise comes down to accumulating a storehouse of categories for structuring new information.

To continue reading, you must be a Teaching Professor Subscriber. Please log in or sign up for full access.

Related Articles

How long is it before you touch your phone after you awake? Some of you will say right away...
Anxious not to be guilty of “policing,” many faculty work hard to prevent academic dishonesty by focusing on...
You know the feeling. We all deal with it. Walking into a classroom the first day of a new...
I’ve been wanting to write about my journey to embrace Rumi’s wisdom in my pedagogy. My teaching career...
We’ve now had ChatGPT in our lives for just over a year, but according to commentators, AI has...
Higher education recognizes the importance of tutoring support to improve student success and retention. But human tutoring is...
The Teaching Professor Conference 2024

June 7-9, 2024 • New Orleans

Connect with Fellow Educators at The Teaching Professor Conference!