Mentoring New Faculty: Five Strategies

Two female professors, one older and one younger, review material on a computer screen
Whether for a newly minted PhD or a subject-matter expert plucked from outside academia, starting a college teaching career can be daunting. A new faculty member needs a guide, a role model, and a trusted friend to jump-start their success in the classroom. A mentor can fulfill these roles by sharing expertise and camaraderie, but where should they begin if assigned to a new hire or a newbie seeks them out for assistance? When a faculty mentoring program exists, a veteran instructor will be paired with a “mentee,” and institutional guidelines will facilitate the work. Without an established program, new hires may seek help informally. In either case, the following five strategies can facilitate mentoring.

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