Learning about Learning after the Exam

Exam debriefs are typically that: brief. The tests are passed back, score ranges are revealed, and the teacher goes over the most missed questions, identifying and explaining the correct answer. There may be a chance for students to ask questions, but most sit passively. This way of debriefing exams is efficient but has little else going for it. Students miss questions in most cases because they don't know the material, which is the likely result of not having studied enough or not having used effective strategies when studying.

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