When Teachers Change Their Minds

Credit: iStock.com/themacx
Credit: iStock.com/themacx
While combing through the materials sent in response to our call for content on extra credit, I noticed a surprising number of contributions begin by acknowledging a change of mind regarding extra credit. But the direction of that change isn’t what I want to explore here. Rather, it’s the legitimacy, indeed value, of changing our minds—and if not actually changing them, at least being open to the possibility of moving from one position to another.

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