Metacognition: The Skill Students Need and Often Don’t Have

Credit: iStock.com/UASUMY
Credit: iStock.com/UASUMY
Another of those loosely defined but favorite words in higher education, metacognition is mostly understood superficially—“thinking about thinking.” We consider it broadly, generically, as it relates to learning. The mental processes involved are not easy to observe or measure. Even though most academics have good metacognitive skills, their understanding of them rests mostly on tacit knowledge.

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